How Do You Prep?

How many of you actively prep for a SHTF situation? How many have thought a little bit about it and have some supplies that might get you through a week? Who hasn’t done anything at all to prepare if something happens to ruin the current economy?

We have camping supplies and a 72 hour freeze dried meal kit but that is about as far as we have gone with prepping. With recent news that the stock market may completely shut down, I am thinking I need to do a bit more in terms of preparing my family for the worst. So I decided instead of my normal grocery shopping this week, I was only going to spend half on groceries and rely more on what was in my cupboards so I could use the rest to start buying some things to store. I spend about $100 a week on groceries, so I limited that to $50. I admit I do tend to have plenty stocked and could last longer than a week between trips but I choose not to because I like variety:)

 

This is what I bought on this trip.

Dollar Tree

2 packs  emergency candles (54 hours total)

10 match boxes (320 total matches)

2 sterno cans (off brand)

can opener

Sam’s Club

12 cans (case) corn

12 cans (case)  green beans

12 cans (case) condensed chicken soup

 Walmart

5lbs rice

5 gallon water jug

So I know it isn’t that much but I spent a total of $50 on it and it will at least last us a few days more than what we have in the house. I am planning on buying more each week I go shopping and planning my grocery shopping different to hopefully get on a monthly rotation of supplies that I just restock  as they are used.

I know I need to plan for my kids and my animals as well so that will be something I do on future trips. Food and supplies for the dog, food for the fish (though they probably will end up getting the short end of the stick if we have to bug out), things for the kids to keep them entertained in a time of crisis, as well as things for my husband and myself since we will need something to keep sane.

Future supplies , other than food & water, I’m thinking of: small bottles of propane (lantern and stove), paper goods, foil, diapers, baby wipes, hand sanitizer (wipes and gel), soap, small tool kit, blankets, books, and writing tools. I know we would have to plan for the bare minimum to bug out but anything that could help last in our home and keep the kids safe before that point, the better.

I definitely want to try for more healthier options but I don’t have the ability to can my own food so I will plan with what I am able to since any food will be worth having when there is none left in the stores.

What are you doing to prep? What about having healthy options for your family in a time of crisis? Share in the comments!

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Dehydrating Food for Prepping and Storage

So in my effort to save money but to prep for the worst, I invested in a dehydrator a few years ago. I have used it off and on but ever really in an effort to do anything with it. Well a month ago or so I decided to try it to prep for food storage. I dried some shredded chicken, onions and potatoes. It all turned out pretty good to store but I haven’t attempted to re-hydrate the chicken for use yet! The potatoes were pretty easy to do and after looking at a few sites I decided on my own way. The onions I didn’t read up on anything on how to dry, and the chicken well I did a little reading but went the course on my own. Today I am trying onions (again) and some bread I had stashed in the freezer to make bread crumbs out of.

My dehydrator has no temperature setting so I just watch until the item I am drying is ready.

Dried Shredded Potatoes

1. Boil water while shredding potatoes (I did this by hand but you could use an electric method)

2. Blanch shredded potatoes for a few minutes in the boiling water ( You want it cooked but not mushy)

3. Dry the excess water on paper towels (or towels if you are saving money) and place into dehydrator until dry. It took about 6 hours for 4 potatoes. They are dry when they snap into pieces.  If it still flexes it needs more time.

4. Re-hydrate at a 1 to 1 ratio (1 cup potato:1 cup boiling water) and let sit until water is absorbed. Drain excess water, if any, and eat or fry if desired for hash browns. My potatoes equaled about 1 cup dry to one potato. I used russet potatoes.

Dried Onions

1. Slice onions and discard peel and the ends.

2. Separate rings and place onto dehydrator trays.

3. Dry with other items to minimize the smell or place outside.

4. Dry until it snaps into pieces. If it still flexes it needs more time. It took about 5 hours for one onion.

Dried Chicken

1. Cook chicken in a method you prefer ( I like using my crockpot) and let cool.

2. Discard any fat and skin as that can cause the finished product to go rancid.

3. Shred chicken and place on dehydrator trays until dry. It does remain slightly flexible but overall will be hard and crispy. It took about 4 hours for one chicken breast.

4. I have not tried re-hydrating yet so I will update when I do!

It is an easy way to prep food for a camping trip or just to store for one of those SHTF scenarios. Not to mention budget friendly as my dehydrator only cost $30 new and I just dry extra/ leftover ingredients that I have!